Clinics for January

Happy New Year to everyone.

I hope that if you have been thinking about making eating or exercise changes that you have been thinking of small goals that you can achieve so that you are setting yourself up for success rather than failure.

Clinic availability for the next few weeks:

Narangba clinic    Wednesday afternoon    6 January  ph 3888 9470

Aspley clinic         Monday morning          11 January  ph 3862 9223

Redcliffe clinic      Tuesday afternoon       12 January  ph 3284 8155

Caboolture clinic  Wednesday morning    13 January  ph  3036 5205 or 0409 628 551

Chermside clinic  Wednesday afternoon  14 January  ph 3350 2622

Best wishes,  Cathie Lowe.

 

Final Clinic before Christmas

Well Christmas is screaming up upon me.  I have my food plans organised but still need to get some Christmas presents… Hope you are more organised.

If you need an appointment this week the only clinic is Arana Hills 3351 5888 on Monday afternoon.  There are still appointments available after 3pm if you need to see a Dietitian.

If you have an urgent referral please call me directly on the mobile: 0409 628 551.

With the festive season upon us, please find a link below to a youtube meditation on mindful eating to try.  Regards,  Cathie Lowe.

Appointment availability week starting 7th December

Hi Everyone,

Seems like people are keen to have appointments before Christmas….

This week there are limited appointments available at:

Aspley         Mon 7th December morning    ph 3862 9223

Arana Hills  Mon 7th December afternoon  ph 3351 5888

Redcliffe     Tues 8th December 10.20am  ph  3284 8155

Caboolture Tues 8th December 3.20pm     ph 5431 4312

Narangba    Wed 9th December 3pm         ph 3886 9470

Hope that helps.  Regards,  Cathie Lowe.

It’s National Nutrition Week – Try for 5 Challenge

Happy Monday Everyone,

canstockphoto0184679It’s feeling like summer in Queensland which is when I start looking for salads.  Which is one way of boosting vegetables if you aren’t getting your 5 vegetables a day.  Have a look at the link below for recipe ideas for vegetables.

The Asparagus Crumbed with Parmesan on Bocconcini Salad is a different way to eat asparagus which is in season now.  The Rice Paper Rolls are a great way to boost vegetables and these could be used at a party with the dipping sauce for a different snack. Continuing on with the Asian influence the Asian Salad with Snow Peas and Cashews is a refreshing crunchy salad.

http://pickrightfeelbright.com/nutrition-recipes

And finally a link to a website to help get ideas for how to encourage children to eat more vegetables….

http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/resource/vegetable-snacks-kids

Hope you take on the 5 Vegetable a Day challenge this week.

Regards Cathie.

Sleep is Really, Really Important!

canstockphoto15729484In a new journal article Alyssa Lundahl and Timothy Nelson look at how poor sleep quality and quantity affect the human drive to eat.

The take home message is if you don’t sleep well – try to get help as is has a big impact on your food choices in many ways.

Biologically, researchers have found that disrupted sleep can lead to a 20% increase in the amount of calories people eat and that portion sizes are bigger.  It appears that 2 hormones control most of this higher drive for food.  Lower levels of Leptin (tells our brain we how  satisfied we are with what we’ve eating) are found in stressed adults with disrupted sleep and higher levels of Grehlin (tells our brain we are hungry) occur.  This makes people look for more foods that are sweet, salty or starchy.  Researchers have found other hormones also are changed with poor sleep including cortisol, insulin, glucocorticoids and these also make us change our food choices.

If we don’t sleep well, our ability to think is reduced in several ways and can lead to adults and children eating more foods and for children looking for higher calorie snacks.  Poor sleep affects a part of the brain that helps us with goal directed behaviours and being able to moderate our impulses and emotions.  So it is harder to talk yourself into doing healthy goals like going for a walk, eating more vegetables and harder to say no to tempting higher calorie foods.  Another part of our brain is disturbed with poor sleep, making the brain want more rewards to pleasurable stimuli – so we want that pleasurable sensation from tasting of sweet or  fatty foods more than usual.

Poor sleep affects our emotions.  You are more likely to notice negative events and negative emotions and be emotionally distressed when you have slept poorly. I don’t think it would be a surprise to many people that when feeling negative emotions, adults and children tend to eat more foods. The changes in eating patterns are eating less fruit, vegetables and breakfast cereals and eating  more sugary or high fat foods.

The way humans behave is changed when sleep quality or quantity is poor.  Adults and children are more likely to behave impulsively and plan less when they are tired. So when you are tired it is harder to resist tempting foods if you have an impulsive personality and you will tend to eat more food then you may have wanted or planned to.

So if you are trying to make healthy eating or lifestyle changes, try to get enough undisturbed sleep so that you won’t have extra hormonal, thinking, behavioural and emotional challenges.

Regards and best wishes from sunny Brisbane,  Cathie Lowe Accredited Practising Dietitian

Journal Referance:

Alyssa Lundahl and Timothy D Nelson

Journal of Health Psychology June 2015 Vol 20 6 794-805

http://hpq.sagepub.com/content/20/6/794.full.pdf+html

Christmas Wishes from Dietitian Services Qld

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Wishing you and your family a peaceful and mindful Christmas.

Many years ago, I was at a family Christmas get together that was extremely emotional and stressful – family tensions were high, there were high expectations of what Christmas had to be as it might have been the ‘last’ Christmas for one of the family members.

After about 20 minutes of shoving Christmas nibbles into my mouth I realised I had been unconsciously or unmindfully eating to deal with the stress.  It was the liquorice lolly that I put in my mouth that made me realise what I was doing – as I really don’t like the taste of liquorice.  Yet I’d put it in my mouth because it was there and it was something to do!

So my first wish is that this Christmas Day is a peaceful one for you and your family.  If you know that there is no chance of that- then don’t forget that there are tips to cope and people that you can talk to such as Lifeline if it gets hard.

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Christmas_can_be_stressful

My second wish is that everyone can have a mindful day – be able to enjoy the little things such as the taste of a really sweet cherry or a juicy ripe peach or a hug from a loved one or enjoying the warm sunshine on your skin or the cool water from the surf or a pool.  Be able to breathe slowly around any difficult emotions that arise and be able to let unhelpful thoughts  pass through your brain like clouds floating in the air. Enjoy some movement – playing backyard cricket, going for a post dinner stroll, have a swim.

As my clients know, my last wish is that you enjoy all the festive food that you really, really like on Christmas day but watch out for unmindful eating or you’ll end up eating liquorice!

Cathie Lowe.

Understanding Dementia Course

dementiaThis is just a quick plug for the University of Tasmania’s free online course on Understanding Dementia.  This is a great course for people that work in community care of nursing homes that work with people with dementia.  The next course starts in October 2014.

The link for more information is below:

www.utas.edu.au/wicking/understanding-dementia

Texture Modified Diets and Thickened Fluid Resources

When people have swallowing problems, a Speech Pathologist may recommend different textures of food (soft, minced moist, smooth puree) or thicknesses of fluids (mild, moderate, extremely thick).  Many people have difficulty preparing foods that look appetising with the change in texture.

I’ve included resources that I have found that may be useful for carers, nursing home staff and kitchen staff.

Education in Nutrition DVD Food and Nutrition Considerations in Dysphagia – presented by Janet Martin APD and author.  This DVD discusses the swallowing process, signs of swallowing problems, the different texture and fluid levels and how to prepare meals that are interesting and taste great. View information.

Janet Martin is the author of two recipes books for texture modified diets.  Good Looking, Easy Swallowing Recipe book is available from most book shops.

Her second recipe book is available through Nestle and is called A Kitchen Manual for Preparation of Modified Texture Diets and has recipes such as Chicken and Apricot Mousse Salad to get everyone thinking differently about puree foods!

For nursing homes and hospitals or for carers there is a poster of the different texture modified diets and thickened fluids if you follow the link below. View poster.

Healthy School Lunches

Examples of Breads dairy healthy lunches blog fruit and vegetables for health lunch blog protein healthy lunch blog vegies healthy lunch blog

 

 

One form of bread and cereal – bread, bread rolls, pita bread, tortillas, rice, pasta, crackers that don’t have heaps of salt, sushi

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Some dairy or soy alternative – cheese and yoghurt are the common options.  There are all sorts of cheese – cottage cheese, cheese sticks, chunks of cheddar.  Yoghurt can be purchased in big containers and then portioned out to suit your child in smaller lunch tubs.

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Fruit – seasonal fruit tastes the best.  Put fruit that easily gets squished into little containers to protect it.  Common fruit options include apples, bananas, grapes but depending on your child it could be strawberries, kiwifruit, stone fruit in summer, blueberries, pears, oranges and mandarins in winter.

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Protein – you may be limited with options if the school  is nut free.  Options include:  leftover roast meat, chicken, ham, tuna or salmon, hard boiled egg, baked beans, hommous, peanut butter (if allowed at school), cheese, cottage cheese

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One vegetable for munch and crunch time – carrot sticks, celery sticks, cucumber sticks, sliced capsicum, cherry tomatoes, lettuce or baby spinach leaves (its amazing how many kids will eat these), sliced radish

 

 

Healthy school lunch boxes vary depending on the child.  Some children like variety and the lunch box has to be swapped around every few days.  Other children will happily eat the same types of lunches week in, week out.

It is perfectly ok to send the same lunch every day if it is healthy (eg cheese sandwich, apple, carrot sticks).

The benefits of sending a healthy lunch box can be obvious – good concentration in class, plenty of energy and then the less obvious benefits such as teeth without fillings, kids that aren’t struggling with body weight issues.

The obvious problem is getting kids to eat the healthy foods!  Persevere, persevere, persevere – and if you still have troubles go and talk to an Accredited Practising Dietitian.

If you purchase fruit and vegetables in season you will only pay $2-4 per kg, if possible buy small pieces of fruit to reduce wastage.  For a giggle look at the cost per kg (not cost per 100g) of other common processed kid snacks.  Some of them are around $23/kg!

You will have other wise tips for fellow parents, feel free to post them on the blog.  Wishing you and your children a happy and stress free year at school.  Cathie Lowe